Losing Weight with PCOS – Low Carb May Help Insulin

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[by Rowell Sahip]

A condition known as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects between 5% and 10% of women who are pregnant. It has a significant impact on a woman’s fertility. When a woman has PCOS, her body does not produce enough eggs, which can lead to infertility and difficulties getting pregnant.

The majority of PCOS cases are unrelated to genetics, but they all involve hormonal imbalances. An excess of androgen, or “male” hormone, results in the production of fewer eggs. Androgen hormones are present in much greater quantities in men than in women. As a result of this hormonal imbalance, the cysts that are a normal part of egg production do not grow. As a result, a woman with PCOS has numerous small cysts on her ovaries that never mature enough to produce eggs. The cysts would typically disappear once this process was complete.

The likelihood of having more facial hair and an increased risk of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes are additional outcomes of higher levels of androgen hormones.

It’s interesting to note that low-carb diets like the Zone Diet may benefit overweight PCOS women. A recent study included 11 overweight, non-diabetic women with PCOS who were, on average, 33 years old. A “standard” diet with 56 percent carbohydrates and 16 percent protein was compared to a diet with 43 percent carbohydrates and 15 percent protein in the study. By 14%, the low-carb diet had a significantly higher fat content than the standard diet. This is higher than the Zone diet would allow. Polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids made up nearly equal portions of the low-carb diet’s fat content. The fat substance of the standard eating regimen was equally divided between the two sorts of unsaturated fats yet was somewhat higher (by 3%) in the monounsaturated assortment.

 

Also compared was a third diet that was high in both carbohydrates and monounsaturated fatty acids. Each diet was only followed by the study participants for 16 days. They tried all three diets after a three-week break.

The researchers were interested in determining whether a low-carb diet could reduce insulin circulating in the body because androgen hormone production is influenced by insulin’s presence. They thought this would help PCOS in some indirect way.

The women’s cholesterol, fasting insulin levels, free fatty acid levels, and insulin response were positively impacted, even though the lower carb diet had no significant effect on circulating hormones. A sign that PCOS sufferers may benefit from a low-carb diet is the improvement in their insulin response. Additionally, the fact that the women only followed the diet for 16 days may explain why their circulating insulin levels were not more significantly affected.

The study’s authors state that: It is anticipated that a reduction in insulin will ultimately result in an improved endocrine profile because elevated insulin is believed to contribute to the endocrine abnormalities in PCOS.

They go on to say that these improvements suggest that overweight women with PCOS should probably follow a low-carb diet with fewer calories.

Not all low carb slims down are made equivalent, nonetheless. Some people have been found to have a higher risk of heart problems and ended up in the hospital because of the Atkins diet.

A 40-year-old woman who strictly followed the Atkins diet for about a month ended up in the hospital with very high levels of acids in her blood. The process of starving the body of certain nutrients beyond a certain threshold level causes the release of acids in the blood, known as ketosis. This is an indication of the “success” of the Atkins diet. Carbohydrates are, of course, the nutrient.

The brain uses only carbohydrates as a source of energy for the body. However, the body will resort to alternative energy metabolization strategies after the threshold level of carbohydrate deprivation. Although it makes use of stored protein and fat, this method of generating energy for the body is not particularly biologically effective. As a result, ketones are many acidic metabolic byproducts. The body excretes these by releasing them into the bloodstream.

In the case of this woman, these byproducts of metabolism were not eliminated sufficiently quickly, so they built up in her bloodstream. She was throwing up four to six times daily. She was taken to the intensive care unit because this buildup of acids in her blood represented a risky situation.

In response, the Atkins Foundation stated that this woman must have had clinical or abnormal metabolic conditions. However, this woman’s obesity places her in a market for the Atkins diet, so there is real cause for concern. Obesity increases the likelihood of metabolic as well as general medical issues. A person would not be obese if they did not have metabolic problems of some kind. This is a significant issue until those potential dangers are fully comprehended, even if there were circumstances that were unique to this woman here. It is ironic that a diet should be promoted as a “way of life,” which means it should be used for a long time, and that it should be implied that it is not suitable for people with metabolic issues. ###

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Diyaryo Milenyo

DIYARYO MILENYO is a free and independent online media outfit that publishes events happening in the local communities and current issues that matter to the public with local, national and global implications. DIYARYO MILENYO is composed of volunteer journalists and community writers scattered in various parts of the Philippines. They report the news right and where it happens. It adheres to the standards and ethics of journalism. It imposes strict rules against attacking someone. Strictly adhering to publish good news only.
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