CAMPUS In Focus John Darryl R. Caysido Technology

Catching Up on Reading During Pandemic: A Teacher’s Perspective

So much has been said about how to improve reading and, by extension, literacy during the coronavirus pandemic. It is critical that individuals, particularly educators, take advantage of the situation, or opportunities, to usher in a new normal in what is otherwise an abnormal way of life imposed on us by the current situation.

E-learning concept. Books stacked on a computer keyboard. 3d illustration
John Darryl R. Caysido
Head Teacher III
Jaen South Annex, SDO Nueva Ecija

So much has been said about how to improve reading and, by extension, literacy during the coronavirus pandemic. It is critical that individuals, particularly educators, take advantage of the situation, or opportunities, to usher in a new normal in what is otherwise an abnormal way of life imposed on us by the current situation.

Because of our limited social mobilization, we have more time for ourselves, more opportunities for self-enrichment, and thus a higher level of professionalism and expertise that we can bring to the classroom. One way for a teacher to explore these enrichment opportunities is to devote time to personal reading, which means attempting and actually spending time reading different materials suited to their personal and professional preferences.  According to “edutopia” an online publication, reading would prepare an individual to be more mentally ready in the performance of their tasks as teachers (Harris and King, 2020).

Reading does not refer to the traditional method of finding a suitable corner with a paperback in one hand and a coffee mug in the other. Reading can be done in a variety of ways; here are a few examples of how we can make the most of our reading time:

1.    Classical Literature (good titles are easily available for sale from various online sellers, and they are selling at big discounts)

2.    Searching the internet for personal interests (graphics are not highly recommended, texts are still the best way to develop our reading and comprehension skills, and yes, even professionals need to improve their linguistic skills)

3.    Facebook updates (this could be very time-consuming as we have the tendency to become hooked on online gossips and personal issues)

4.    Change up your social media platforms (one would be very surprised to know that different social media platforms present different points of view of society, meaning the ones you read on Facebook are totally non-existent discussion on Twitter, to cite a few concrete examples)

5.    Research, research, research (if we want to be a few steps ahead of our students, we need to broaden our knowledge horizon on a regular basis). Furthermore, in an age when Google and other search engines are readily available, it is a mortal sin not to be aware of almost everything and every bit of information, as it is only a tip of a finger away.

Again, these are simply suggestions for how we can take advantage of the new normal situation in which our physical mobility is severely limited and we must adhere to strict health protocols in order to contribute to the general well-being of the people. We can still cope in a variety of ways. We can spend more time with loved ones and tend to our personal needs, but more importantly, we must do something to maintain our mental health and live a better and more informed life. #DM

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